Month: March 2015

Assignment 4: Cereal Advert

The fourth assignment involved creating a storyboard for a cereal product advertisement, targeted at a younger audience with the USP of it being healthy and nutritious. It required research and analysis of existing products, as well as the design of a mascot character to be used in the advert.

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Assignment 1: Character Design

Our first assignment was to design a character for a multimedia franchise i.e. a franchise that exists in various mediums and platforms. We were tasked with presenting this character using a single image. Within the story this character belongs to, they would be forced to make a decision, and the image of that character would need to depict that decision.

Assignment 4 Final Product

Product Profile

Cereal: Blueberry Beat

A blue blueberry-flavoured cereal that contains antioxidants to keep kids healthy, and gives them the energy they need to get through the day.

Mascot: Bounce Bunny

A trendy, cool DJ rabbit who loves to eat breakfast. He is the energetic mascot that introduces the kids to Blueberry Beats to get them energetic in the morning. His character was designed to be a typical cool character used in the media to appeal to a younger audience, as it is seen as what’s ‘hip’. However, his design was kept simpler to make it easier to market.

Bounce Bunny
Bounce Bunny, the mascot character for Blueberry Beats.

Storyboard

 

 

Assignment 4 Research

Trix

The Trix mascot is a white anthropomorphic rabbit that is always seen trying to trick kids so it can get their cereal, but ultimately fails following the slogan “Trix are for kids”. It technically never does anything “wrong” per se, so it is a suitable mascot for a kid’s cereal. The focus of the ad is the cereal’s flavours.

Coco Pops

The mascot character for Kellogg’s Coco Pops is Coco, a monkey wearing a blue hat and a white t-shirt with the word “coco” printed on the front. The key selling point of the advert is that the chocolate in the cereal affects the milk as well, effectively doubling as a breakfast and a source of chocolate milk. Another selling point is the activities on the back of the box, a staple feature of most kids cereal products. The activities tie in heavily with the story in the ads, so when a child that has been drawn into the story do the activity they feel that they are contributing to the characters.

Weetabix Chocolate

Weetabix doesn’t have a mascot character, but still advertises successfully to children. This ad in particular plays on Weetabix’s USP of wholegrain products giving people enough energy for the day, and presents it to kids through the use of professional dancing. The main character in this ad, the dancing girl, is able to perform an impressive dance after eating just a bit. This suggests to the target audience that such feats are capable when eating Weetabix.

Assignment 6 Research

Drax: The Cyborg Wars logo design

Since the game is styled like a Saturday morning cartoon and is sci-fi themed, I would envision it as parodying most sci-fi tropes. To fit this idea, the logo itself would mimic those of sci-fi shows and films from bygone days.

Here are a few examples of sci-fi logos:

Voltron-Banner
Voltron: Defender of the Universe logo

Voltron: Defenders of the Universe (1984). Notice the multi-coloured logo. This was to fit with the show’s main cast, “Voltron Lion Force”, each of which had different colour themes. The text is also very angular, which matches Japan’s old idea of sci-fi robots being blocky.

A_Transformers_Logo
Transformers logo

Transformers (1984). The red and silver colour scheme, as well as the Autobot insignia in the title, were designed to match Optimus Prime, the main Transformer protagonist of the series. It’s reflective appearance denotes shiny chrome, a common aesthetic in futuristic settings.

The_Jetsons_Logo
The Jetsons logo

 

The Jetsons (1962). While it hadn’t been explicably stated when the show was set, The Jetsons was still set in the future envisioned in the 1960s. Almost all depictions of the future, at least in the past, have sleeker designs, which explains why the logo for this show was so rounded out compared to the Voltron and Transformers logos.

Assignment 3: Skyline Video

The third assignment required us to create a 10 second video of a place in the local area, with the skyline replaced by a sci-fi setting. This would be done with the use of Final Cut Pro, a video editing software.

To create the video, we first shot the raw footage using a digital camera, kept steady on a tripod. We found a spot and shot the video, making sure that nothing passed in front of the skyline or the camera. Once that was done we opened up the video and took a screenshot. In Photoshop, we used selection tools such as the Polygonal Lasso Tool and the Quick Selection Tool to cut the sky out of the image. We then used the existing marquee to cut the same shape out of a shot of the Carina Nebula. Finally, we placed both the raw footage and the composite into Final Cut Pro and overlaid the composite. All that needed to be done was export the video as a QuickTime Video.

The final video came out okay. The composite was a bit rough because of the shape of the skyline, and the exposure can be seen around the edges. It was also uncropped, meaning it was over 30 seconds as opposed to 10.

Raw footage:

http://youtu.be/d3-T4FNgwgk

Raw image:

Carina_Nebula_by_ESO

Composite Image:

Composit

Final video:

Assignment 6 Research

Logo design

Since the game is styled like a Saturday morning cartoon and is sci-fi themed, I envision it as a game that would parody most sci-fi tropes. To fit this idea, the logo itself would mimic those of sci-fi shows and films fr  om bygone days.

Here are a few examples of sci-fi logos:

Voltron-Banner
Voltron: Defenders of the Universe (1984). Notice the multi-coloured logo. This was to fit with the show’s main cast, “Voltron Lion Force”, each of which had different colour themes.

 

A_Transformers_Logo
Transformers (1984). The red and silver colour scheme, as well as the Autobot insignia in the title, were designed to match Optimus Prime, the main Transformer protagonist of the series.
The_Jetsons_Logo
The Jetsons (1962). While it hadn’t been explicably stated when the show was set, The Jetsons was still set in the future envisioned in the 1960s. Almost all depictions of the future, at least in the past, have sleeker designs, which explains why the logo for this show was so rounded out.